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AXIA Stair System

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Stainless steel

In metallurgy, stainless steel, also known as inox steel or inox from French inoxydable (inoxidizable), is a steel alloy with a minimum of 10.5% chromium content by mass.

Stainless steel is notable for its corrosion resistance, and it is widely used for food handling and cutlery among many other applications. Stainless steel does not readily corrode, rust or stain with water as ordinary steel does. However, it is not fully stain proof in low-oxygen, high-salinity, or poor air-circulation environments.

There are various grades and surface finishes of stainless steel to suit the environment the alloy must endure. Stainless steel is used where both the properties of steel and corrosion resistance are required. Stainless steel differs from carbon steel by the amount of chromium present. Unprotected carbon steel rusts readily when exposed to air and moisture. This iron oxide film (the rust) is active and accelerates corrosion by making it easier for more iron oxide to form. Since iron oxide has lower density than steel, the film expands and tends to flake and fall away. In comparison, stainless steels contain sufficient chromium to undergo passivation, forming an inert film of chromium oxide on the surface. This layer prevents further corrosion by blocking oxygen diffusion to the steel surface and stops corrosion from spreading into the bulk of the metal. Passivation occurs only if the proportion of chromium is high enough and oxygen is present in it.

Stainless steel’s resistance to corrosion and staining, low maintenance, and familiar lustre make it an ideal material for many applications.

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